Calendar

Apr
12
Wed
Student Awards Celebration and Dinner @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 12 @ 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

The School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences will hold its annual Student Awards Celebration and Dinner on Wednesday, April 12 at 5:00 p.m. The event will be held at the Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Building Conference Room (1101) located at 602 Duncan Drive, Auburn.

Apr
13
Thu
Master’s Defense: Rafael Affonso Santiago @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 13 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Forestry Master’s Defense: Rafael Affonso Santiago, Maj. Prof, Dr. Tom Gallagher

Title: Coppicing Evaluation in the Southeast of the U.S. to Determine Harvesting Methods for Bioenergy Production

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Thursday, April 13, 2017

Time: 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Abstract:

Renewable fuels are being tested as an alternative for fossil fuels. For the Southeast of the U.S., the use of woody biomass has been proven to be an excellent source of renewable energy in terms of cost-benefit and availability. Short rotation woody crops (SRWC) are timber plantations with exclusive characteristics that greatly meet intensive wood demand due their fast growth and ability to coppice. Coppice allows trees to regenerate multiple stems from the stump after the original tree is harvested. There are still uncertainties related to the potential complications caused by the agglomeration of stems on mechanized harvesting. In this study we investigate the physical attributes of two SRWC species, two years after harvest. A logistic regression was fit in an attempt to predict the probability of a stump to regenerate more or less stems based on the damage caused on the stump during harvest and stump diameter. Additionally, we examined the effects on stem crowding and final yield caused by season of harvest. The species used on this experiment were Eucalypt (Eucalyptus urograndis) (Florida) and Cottonwood (Populus deltoides) (Arkansas). In both locations, the seedling trees were harvested in different seasons (summer and winter) in order to stablish the seasonal plots. Data collection took place six months, and two years after harvest to investigate biomass gain, stem crowding, and clump dimension of the coppiced trees. Results from both species showed that stump diameter is positively related with stem crowding. The eucalyptus trees showed that stem crowding was negatively affected by stump damage. Seasonality of harvesting did not affect stem crowding in both species. The shape and dispersion of the regenerated stems did not present significant evidence that would affect harvest operations with current technology. In all cases, approximately 1% of the trees exceeded the threshold that represents unfeasibility of harvesting. Higher yields of dry biomass were found in the winter plots of both species. At age two, the dominant stems were not yet strong enough to suppress the neighboring stems, therefore, the volume found per stump increased nearly linearly with the number of stems growing from it.

Committee:

Thomas V. Gallagher, Chair, Professor, Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

Mathew Smidt, Professor, Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

Dana Mitchell, Project Leader, United States Forest Service

 

Apr
14
Fri
Seminar Series: Genetic monitoring of wildlife populations: case studies from endangered carnivores, ungulates and lagomorphs @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 14 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Spring Seminar Series Presents:

Lisette Waits of the Department of Fish & Wildlife Sciences, University of Idaho, gives a talk entitled: Genetic monitoring of wildlife populations: case studies from endangered carnivores, ungulates and lagomorphs

Seminar held at 11am in room 1101 in the SFWS Building, 602 Duncan Drive, Auburn, AL 36849.

  • Complimentary cookies and coffee will be served.
  • Parking is available at the parking deck on Duncan Drive, directly across from the SFWS Building. See Parking Services on Level 3 for a Visitor Pass.
  • CFEs available on request.

To review or download the SFWS Seminar Series fall schedule, visit:  http://wp.auburn.edu/sfws/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/2017-Spring-SFWS-Seminar-Series.pdf

Master’s Defense: John Draper @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 14 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Wildlife Sciences Master’s Defense: John Draper, Maj. Prof, Dr. Todd Steury

Title: Genetic Diversity and Connectivity of Black Bears (Ursus americanus) in Alabama.

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 14, 2017

Time: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

 

 

Apr
19
Wed
Seminar Series: Blacklegged tick abundance and questing behavior are key determinants of regional variation in Lyme disease risk in the eastern U.S. @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 19 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Spring Seminar Series Presents:

Graham Hickling of the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, Knoxville, TN, will give a talk entitled: Blacklegged tick abundance and questing behavior are key determinants of regional variation in Lyme disease risk in the eastern U.S.

Seminar held at 11am in room 1101 in the SFWS Building, 602 Duncan Drive, Auburn, AL 36849.

  • Complimentary cookies and coffee will be served.
  • Parking is available at the parking deck on Duncan Drive, directly across from the SFWS Building. See Parking Services on Level 3 for a Visitor Pass.
  • CFEs available on request.

To review or download the SFWS Seminar Series fall schedule, visit:  http://wp.auburn.edu/sfws/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/2017-Spring-SFWS-Seminar-Series.pdf

Apr
21
Fri
Doctoral Defense: Jagdish Poudel @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 21 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Forestry Economics Doctoral Defense: Jagdish Poudel, Maj. Prof, Dr. Daowei Zhang

Title: Economic analysis of habitat conservation banking in the United States

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Friday, April 21, 2017

Time: 8:00 – 9:00 a.m.

Abstract:

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is probably the most powerful environmental law ever enacted in the United States and is often portrayed as one of the most extreme forms of government intervention. Private landowners often avoid management activities that can potentially attract endangered species into their land and probably take actions to eliminate endangered species habitats. Several landowner incentive programs have been implemented by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to encourage landowner to manage their land in ways that provide ecosystem services to promote the recovery of listed species.

Conservation banking offers financial incentives to landowners in exchange for managing land in a way that provides habitat for endangered species. This feature of the market-based approach is generating specific price signals for entrepreneurs to get involved in solving environmental issues. The United States pioneered conservation banking program and is recognized as a leader in implementing biodiversity offsets as a means to conserve endangered species. Few studies have evaluated the performance of conservation banking market. However, most of those studies were conducted a decade ago.

In the first chapter, we fill the gap by quantifying the number of total banks, conservation credit inventory, sales, and analyze the trends and the characteristics of conservation banks. As of December 2015, we find 137 conservation banks conserving some 153,000 acres of land. This number has increased to 180,298 acres recently. Nearly, 519,540 conservation credits were generated from 137 banks and some 71,365 credits were sold in last 21 years. About 66% of conservation credits were sold by private companies and credit price ranges between $1,500 and $198,560 per credits. This chapter concludes that conservation banking has become a business-based habitat planning system and that large urban areas tend to have the highest demand for conservation credits and are willing to pay the highest prices per credit.

The second chapter presents an econometric analysis of factors influencing demand and supply of the conservation credit market. The results reveal that demand and supply are inelastic to price, suggesting that conservation credit price changes are not likely to result in significant changes in the demand for credits. Inverse price and quantity relation shows the actual distribution of price in the market. Furthermore, the results suggest that the marginal production of conservation credit is likely to increase over time with more land area allocated for conservation bank and likely to decrease with increased in land value.

The third chapter uses hedonics to explores the relationship between credit prices and the characteristics of credits. This approach allows an implicit price to be estimated for each covariate. Private bank ownership, species types, the number of listed endangered species, and time factors were significant predictors of credit price. These results should be useful for landowners, bankers, and investors interested in enhancing the marketability of their land and understanding the effect of management actions.

Chapter four assesses the conservation banking project investment by examining the costs structure, revenue, and profitability of several conservation banks. We calculated the net present value of selected numbers of conservation bank located in California at the discount rates of 5.57%. Results show that the all eight selected conservation banks’ NPV appears to be positive. Our findings suggest that the investment in conservation banking is not only profitable but also yield high returns. Those landowners who may have discouraged because of lack of knowledge and data and from the fear that presence of endangered species habitat in their land would result in a regulatory compliance can be reassured from our finding that conservation banking can be perspective market for financial incentives.

Finally, we conclude that conservation banking market is dynamic and imperfect and an econometric model that incorporates either the dynamic or oligopolistic aspects of the conservation banking market, or both, seems to be a more promising prospect for future research.

 

May
2
Tue
Master’s Defense: Sarah Lessard @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
May 2 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Wildlife Sciences Master’s Defense: Sarah Lessard, Maj. Prof, Dr. Wayde Morse

Title: The Human Dimensions of Whooping Crane Conservation in Alabama

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Time: 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

 

 

May
4
Thu
Master’s Defense: Rebecca John @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
May 4 @ 9:00 am – 10:15 am

Wildlife Sciences Master’s Defense: Rebecca John, Maj. Prof, Dr. Bob Gitzen

Title:  Movement, Occupancy, and Detectability of Green Salamanders in Northern Alabama.

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Thursday, May 4, 2017

Time: 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

 

 

Jun
15
Thu
Ph.D. Seminar: Pratima Devkota @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Jun 15 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Forestry Ph.D. Seminar: Pratima Devkota, Maj. Prof, Dr. Lori Eckhardt

Title: Response of P. taeda L. Families to Vascular-Inhabiting Ophiostomatoid Fungi

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Thursday, June 15, 2017

Time: 8:00 – 9:00 a.m.

Abstract:

Pinus taeda (loblolly pine), a most widely cultivated timber species in the southern U.S., creates 110,000 job opportunities and contributes 30 billion dollars to the southern economy. However, insect-vectored root-infecting ophiostomatoid fungi, Leptographium terebrantis, and Grosmannia huntii are potential threats to sustainable P. taeda forest management in the southern U.S. Understanding the intra-species response of P. taeda to these fungi is critical to mitigate the potential problem due to these fungi. Thus, the objectives of my research are: i. to determine the intra-species tolerance/susceptibility of P. taeda to L. terebrantis and G. huntii, ii. to understand whether intra-species tolerance of P. taeda to L. terebrantis and G. huntii remain same regardless of the tree growth stage iii. to understand the interaction of the vascular-inhabiting fungi and P. taeda under drought conditions, iv. to determine the antibiosis potential of these fungi by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), v. to understand whether PGPR can induce resistance of P. taeda families to these fungi, vi. to determine the intra-specific variation in virulence of L. terebrantis, vii. to determine the growth potential of most virulent L. terebrantis at different inoculum densities in P. taeda wood segments, and viii. to determine the growth potential of various blue-stain fungi on P. taeda stem segments.

In study 1, seedlings from 94 P. taeda families were artificially inoculated at the stem with L. terebrantis and G. huntii and family responses were studied. In study 2, the roots of the mature P. taeda trees from 4 families were inoculated with these two fungi to understand the intra-specific response of mature trees. In study 3, P. taeda families were exposed to drought and simultaneously inoculated with vascular-inhabiting fungi and impacts were studied. In study 4, PGPR strains and ophiostomatoid fungi were plated together in a dual agar plate and the antibiosis potential of PGPR strains to fungi was studied. In addition, induced systemic resistance of P. taeda to L. terebrantis and G. huntii were studied by inoculating PGPR in soil and fungi in stems of P. taeda families. In study 5, most virulent L. terebrantis was inoculated to P. taeda stem segments at different inoculum densities. In study 6, various blue-staining ophiostomatoid fungi were cultured in P. taeda stem segments to study their growth potential.

The results suggest P. taeda poses varying intra-species tolerance to ophiostomatoid fungi with potential for selection of relatively tolerant families. Moreover, this intra-species variation in tolerance is an inherent character of P. taeda, regardless of the tree growth stage. The growth and productivity of P. taeda families decrease and fungal pathogenicity increase under severe drought. Specific strains of PGPR have the ability to inhibit the growth of blue-staining fungi in vitro. Specific PGPR strains have the ability to induce systemic resistance of P. taeda during fungal infection. Fungal growth and blue-staining potential are high when fungal inoculation points are close. Growth and staining potential of L. terebrantis in P. taeda stem segment is higher compared to G. huntii and G. alacris. Results from our study provide meaningful insights into P. taeda and ophiostomatoid fungal interaction.

 

Jun
25
Sun
Forestry Camp: June 25 – 30, 2017 @ Auburn University
Jun 25 @ 6:18 pm – Jun 30 @ 7:18 pm

Alabama Cooperative Extension System (ACES) and Auburn School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences (SFWS) are offering Forestry Field Camp in 2017! Alabama has a wealth of forest related natural resources. It is the third most forested US state – two out of every three acres in Alabama is forested! This hands-on camp will give students an opportunity to get outdoors and learn about forestry in Alabama and the importance of forestry field measurements in making forest management decisions.

Taught by ACES and SFWS forestry professionals, Forestry Camp is open to high school students ages 15-18. Students will learn how to take forest tree measurements, sample forests for inventory information and use a professional grade GPS for a geocaching adventure around Auburn’s campus. Camp will conclude with a fun forestry conclave activity where students have the opportunity to compete in technical events such as compass and pacing, and tree diameter and height estimation to showcase their newly acquired skills.

Students will experience an amazing campus-life in this one week program full of evening social and recreational activities. Camp participants will have 24/7 counselor supervision.

This camp is intended for rising 9th – 12th grade students.

Visit Auburn Youth Programs website to register. At any time during the registration process, if you run into a problem or have a question, please call the registration office at (334) 844 – 5100 or e-mail us at auyouth@auburn.edu. The office is open Monday through Friday from 7:45am to 4:45pm CST.

602 Duncan Drive | Auburn, Alabama 36849 | 334-844-4000 |
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