Calendar

Mar
28
Tue
Master’s Defense: Cameron Poyner @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Mar 28 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Forestry Master’s Defense: Cameron Poyner, Maj. Prof, Dr. Joseph Fan

Title: Overstory management to regenerate longleaf pine and control invasive Chinese tallow in fire ecosystems

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 14, 2017

Time: 8:00 – 9:00 a.m.

 

 

Mar
29
Wed
Master’s Defense: Megan Bartholomew @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Mar 29 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Natural Resources Master’s Defense: Megan Bartholomew, Maj. Prof, Dr. Christopher Anderson

Title: Evaluating the functional response of isolated cypress domes to groundwater alteration in west-central Florida

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Time: 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Abstract:

The hydrology of a wetland is the single most important determinant of its function and slight alterations can lead to significant changes in plant communities and biogeochemistry within the wetland. Therefore, understanding the influence of hydrology on vegetative and soil processes is pivotal to restoration efforts. This study investigated how hydrologic alteration and recovery influenced wetland vegetation and soil processes in Starkey Wilderness Park (SWP), a well-field in west-central Florida. Vegetation responses to groundwater alterations were observed using long term species and hydrologic data collected from SWP. The results from the vegetation study suggest that hydrologic recovery has restored vegetative functions and measures, such as species richness and hydrophytic assemblages, in a relatively short (5-7 year) period. However, differences in species composition and community variation persist in wetlands of various degrees of hydrologic alterations. A field study was also conducted to determine how hydrologic alterations continue to affect wetland decomposition rates and other soil processes. After eight years of hydrologic recovery, altered wetlands experienced faster decomposition than reference wetlands and rates seemed to be linked to differences in both inundation and percent soil organic matter. The findings from this study suggest functional restoration of vegetation and soils should be determined on an individual wetland depending on severity and over longer periods (>5 years). In some cases, overall restoration goals may need to be reassessed as ecosystem development progresses.

 

Apr
3
Mon
Master’s Defense: John Lancaster @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 3 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Forestry Master’s Defense: John Lancaster, Maj. Prof, Dr. Tom Gallagher

Title: Whole Tree Transportation System for Timber Processing Depots

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 3, 2017

Time: 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.

Abstract:

The growing demand for alternative energy has led those interested in producing sustainable energy from renewable biomass such as timber to devise new concepts to satisfy those demands. The concept of timber processing depots, where whole stem trees will be delivered for future processing into wood products and high quality energy fuel, has led to the re-evaluation of current timber transportation methods and whether they can feasibly transport unprocessed trees in an efficient, legal, and safe manner. Modifications for standard double bunk log trailers were developed to accommodate tree length, unprocessed southern yellow pine. The first design was a swinging gate design, and the second was an extendable bolster design. These modification designs ensured that tree crowns were contained within the trailer to prevent contact with and damage to other vehicles while in transport. Consideration of criteria including modification weight, load force analysis, ease of attachment and detachment, and overall feasibility determined which of the two trailer modification designs was chosen for trial load testing. The selected design was fabricated and attached to a standard double bunk log trailer which was loaded to its maximum volume capacity with chip and saw size Pinus taeda. Axle weights were recorded three times for each load of timber: unprocessed, trimmed, and delimbed and processed to a merchantable top. Net load weights, axle weights, and anecdotal observations were used to determine the feasibility of transporting whole tree chip and saw sized loblolly pine to a timber processing depot on the modified trailer.

 

Apr
10
Mon
PhD Defense: Ying Lin @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 10 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Forestry PhD of Applied Economics Defense: Ying Lin, Maj. Prof, Daowei Zhang

Title: Essays on International Timber Products Trade

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 10, 2017

Time: 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.

 

 

Apr
11
Tue
Doctoral Defense: Pratima Devkota @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 11 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Forestry Doctoral Defense: Pratima Devkota, Maj. Prof, Dr. Lori Eckhardt

Title:

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 11, 2017

Time: 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

 

 

Apr
12
Wed
Doctoral Defense: Shree Dangal @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 12 @ 8:30 am – 9:30 am

Forestry Doctoral Defense: Shree Dangal, Maj. Prof, Dr. Hanqin Tian

Title: Interactive Effects of Climate Change and Grazing on Ecosystem Productivity and Greenhouse Gas Balance at Multiple Scales from Landscape to Global

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 12, 2017

Time: 8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

Abstract:

At a global level, the results showed that livestock grazing and climate change reduced net primary productivity at the rate of 28.5 TgC/yr and 10 TgC/yr, respectively. Soil organic carbon, on the other hand, reduced at a rate of 242 TgC/yr in response to grazing and 42 TgC/yr in response to climate change.

The results also showed that methane (CH4) emission from the global ruminant livestock sector accounted for 47-54% of all non-CO2 GHG agricultural emissions. Likewise, nitrous oxide emission from the global grasslands increased significantly from 1.41 Tg N2O-N/yr in 1961 to 1.89 Tg N2O-N/yr in 2014. Managed pastures dominated N2O emission contributing to up to 68% of the total grassland emissions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that increasing livestock production and climate change have profound impacts on the environment and the climate system. In order to mitigate GHG emissions from the livestock sector, direct and indirect approaches that relies on animal (improving feed quality, feed additives, animal productivity) and land (grazing optimization, transition to extensive system) based mitigation approaches and policy (imposing tax on conventional ranching) efforts that promote sustainable intensification should be implemented.

Apr
14
Fri
Master’s Defense: John Draper @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 14 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Wildlife Sciences Master’s Defense: John Draper, Maj. Prof, Dr. Todd Steury

Title: Genetic Diversity and Connectivity of Black Bears (Ursus americanus) in Alabama.

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 14, 2017

Time: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

 

 

May
4
Thu
Master’s Defense: Rebecca John @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
May 4 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Wildlife Sciences Master’s Defense: Rebecca John, Maj. Prof, Dr. Bob Gitzen

Title:

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Thursday, May 4, 2017

Time: 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.

 

 

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