Calendar

Mar
26
Sun
KPNC 5K, Tot Trot & Sunday Stroll @ Kreher Preserve & Nature Center
Mar 26 @ 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Come explore the Kreher Preserve & Nature Center’s beautiful forested trails on this carefully measured, well- marked 5K course. Those who prefer are invited to walk the course. Proceeds benefit the nature center’s operations and environmental education programs. The 5K race starts at 2:30 p.m. Sunday Stroll starts at 3:00 p.m. and the Tot Trot starts at 3:30 p.m. Race day registration begins at 1:00 p.m.

Registration fees vary and include t-shirt, snacks and door prizes. Pre-registration is $20 per runner, $10 for tots, and $15 for strollers. Race day registration is $25 per runner. Same fees apply for tots and strollers. 5K Awards: Top 3 male and female; 1st and 2nd in 10 year groups; 1st Master male and female. Tot Trot Awards: All finishers receive a finisher’s ribbon. Register online auburn.edu/preserve. Race held at the Kreher Preserve & Nature Center located at 2222 N. College Street, Auburn, Al.

Mar
28
Tue
Master’s Defense: Cameron Poyner @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Mar 28 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Forestry Master’s Defense: Cameron Poyner, Maj. Prof, Dr. Joseph Fan

Title: Overstory management to regenerate longleaf pine and control invasive Chinese tallow in fire ecosystems

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 14, 2017

Time: 8:00 – 9:00 a.m.

 

 

Golden Eagles Alumni Luncheon
Mar 28 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

The School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Office of Development will host its Golden Eagles Alumni Luncheon on Tuesday, March 28, 2017.

Mar
29
Wed
Master’s Defense: Megan Bartholomew @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Mar 29 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Natural Resources Master’s Defense: Megan Bartholomew, Maj. Prof, Dr. Christopher Anderson

Title: Evaluating the functional response of isolated cypress domes to groundwater alteration in west-central Florida

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Time: 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Abstract:

The hydrology of a wetland is the single most important determinant of its function and slight alterations can lead to significant changes in plant communities and biogeochemistry within the wetland. Therefore, understanding the influence of hydrology on vegetative and soil processes is pivotal to restoration efforts. This study investigated how hydrologic alteration and recovery influenced wetland vegetation and soil processes in Starkey Wilderness Park (SWP), a well-field in west-central Florida. Vegetation responses to groundwater alterations were observed using long term species and hydrologic data collected from SWP. The results from the vegetation study suggest that hydrologic recovery has restored vegetative functions and measures, such as species richness and hydrophytic assemblages, in a relatively short (5-7 year) period. However, differences in species composition and community variation persist in wetlands of various degrees of hydrologic alterations. A field study was also conducted to determine how hydrologic alterations continue to affect wetland decomposition rates and other soil processes. After eight years of hydrologic recovery, altered wetlands experienced faster decomposition than reference wetlands and rates seemed to be linked to differences in both inundation and percent soil organic matter. The findings from this study suggest functional restoration of vegetation and soils should be determined on an individual wetland depending on severity and over longer periods (>5 years). In some cases, overall restoration goals may need to be reassessed as ecosystem development progresses.

 

Mar
30
Thu
Weaver Lecture Series Presents Dr. Orlando Rojas @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Mar 30 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

The School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences is proud to present the 2017 Weaver Lecture Series. The first lecture of the two-part series offered this year, will be given by Orlando Rojas, Professor of Biobased Colloids and Materials at Aalto University, Finland.

Professor Rojas’ lecture, titled “Nanocelluloses and Multi-phase Systems,” will discuss the Finnish vision of the future bio-economy and the importance of forests as a resource for lignocellulose, the biomass of woody plants, as the ideal precursor for material design.

Previous to Rojas current faculty position at Aalto University, Finland, he was Professor in the departments of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Forest Biomaterials of North Carolina State University.

Earlier in his career he was a senior scientist appointed by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in the Royal Institute of Technology, a postdoctoral fellow in the Institute for Surface Chemistry, Sweden and research assistant at Auburn University.

Rojas’ work is centered on the utilization of lignocellulosic materials in novel, high performance applications and the interfacial and the adsorption behaviors of surfactants and biopolymers at solid/liquid interfaces.

Among his many honors and awards, Rojas was appointed as Finland Distinguish Professor (2009-2014) and was elected with the distinction of Fellow of the American Chemical Society (2013) for his scientific and professional contributions.

Most recently, Rojas was the recipient of the 2015 Nanotechnology Division Technical Award and IMERYS Prize for outstanding contributions that have advanced the industry’s technology. He received the Fibrenamics Award (University of Minho, Portugal, 2016) in recognition for his scientific work and impact in the field of advanced materials from lignocellulose.

The School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences’ Weaver Lecture Series was established in May of 1996 through an endowment provided by Earl H. and Sandra H. Weaver. The objective of the Series is to bring individuals with expertise in various aspects of forestry and wildlife sciences to the Auburn University campus to enhance the School’s academic programs through public lectures and interaction with faculty and students.

The lecture is open to the public and will take place on Thursday, March 30, at 4:00 p.m. at the Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Building at Auburn University. A reception will be held prior to the lecture at 3:30 p.m. For details about the Weaver Lecture Series and to review research abstracts, visit http://wp.auburn.edu/sfws/weaver/.

Apr
1
Sat
SFWS and ACES host BioBlitz at the Kreher Preserve and Nature Center @ Kreher Preserve & Nature Center
Apr 1 @ 7:00 am – 9:00 pm

What is a BioBlitz? A BioBlitz is a hands-on, citizen science event to promote interest in local biodiversity. People will have the opportunity to work in the forest alongside scientists from Auburn University and the local area while discovering the diversity of insects, fish, fungi, plants, mammals, herpetofauna, birds, and bats.

Where? Kreher Preserve and Nature Center, 2222 N. College St. Auburn, Alabama.

When? This come-and-go event is open to the public from 7 a.m. until 9 p.m., Saturday, April 1, 2017. Stay for a couple of hours or stay for the day. It is up to you.

Who can attend? Anyone who loves nature and learning about the natural world! All are invited to attend, including students, teachers, and families.

Does it cost anything to participate? The cost is $5 per person for all participants 10 years old and up. Each participant will get an Explorer’s Kit, which will include a notebook, pencil, and hand lens along with information about Alabama’s forest and wildlife. Registration is encouraged, but not required. Water, light snacks and bathroom facilities will be available on site.

I still have questions. Who can I contact? For more information, contact BioBlitz coordinator Becky Barlow, Alabama Cooperative Extension System Forestry Specialist. Phone: 334-844-1019 Email: rjb0003@aces.edu.

Apr
3
Mon
Master’s Defense: John Lancaster @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 3 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Forestry Master’s Defense: John Lancaster, Maj. Prof, Dr. Tom Gallagher

Title: Whole Tree Transportation System for Timber Processing Depots

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 3, 2017

Time: 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.

Abstract:

The growing demand for alternative energy has led those interested in producing sustainable energy from renewable biomass such as timber to devise new concepts to satisfy those demands. The concept of timber processing depots, where whole stem trees will be delivered for future processing into wood products and high quality energy fuel, has led to the re-evaluation of current timber transportation methods and whether they can feasibly transport unprocessed trees in an efficient, legal, and safe manner. Modifications for standard double bunk log trailers were developed to accommodate tree length, unprocessed southern yellow pine. The first design was a swinging gate design, and the second was an extendable bolster design. These modification designs ensured that tree crowns were contained within the trailer to prevent contact with and damage to other vehicles while in transport. Consideration of criteria including modification weight, load force analysis, ease of attachment and detachment, and overall feasibility determined which of the two trailer modification designs was chosen for trial load testing. The selected design was fabricated and attached to a standard double bunk log trailer which was loaded to its maximum volume capacity with chip and saw size Pinus taeda. Axle weights were recorded three times for each load of timber: unprocessed, trimmed, and delimbed and processed to a merchantable top. Net load weights, axle weights, and anecdotal observations were used to determine the feasibility of transporting whole tree chip and saw sized loblolly pine to a timber processing depot on the modified trailer.

 

Apr
10
Mon
PhD Defense: Ying Lin @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 10 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Forestry PhD of Applied Economics Defense: Ying Lin, Maj. Prof, Daowei Zhang

Title: Essays on International Timber Products Trade

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 10, 2017

Time: 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.

 

 

Apr
11
Tue
Doctoral Defense: Pratima Devkota @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 11 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Forestry Doctoral Defense: Pratima Devkota, Maj. Prof, Dr. Lori Eckhardt

Title:

Location: 3315 Dixon Executive Conference Room

Date: Monday, April 11, 2017

Time: 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.

 

 

Weaver Lecture Series Presents Dr. David Fowler @ School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences
Apr 11 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences is proud to present the 2017 Weaver Lecture Series. The second lecture of the two-part series to be offered this year, will be given by Professor David Fowler, Environmental  of the Natural Environment Research Council, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Professor Fowler’s talk, “Impacts of Human Activities on the Global Nitrogen Cycle Through the 21st Century,” will discuss the efficacy of the Earth’s ecosystems, atmosphere and oceans to globally cycle increased fixed nitrogen from human activity.

Professor Fowler trained in Environmental Physics at the University of Nottingham, obtaining a PhD in 1976 from research on the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide by micrometeorological methods. His research focuses on the surface – atmosphere exchange processes of trace gases and particulate matter and has been applied to ozone, acid deposition, the global biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, emissions of greenhouse gases, atmospheric aerosols and effects of pollutants on vegetation.

Fowler’s work has been widely applied in the development of effects-based pollution control strategies in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in Europe. He was awarded an Honorary Professorship at the University of Nottingham in 1991, became a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1999, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of London in 2002. In 2005, he was awarded a CBE or Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for his research of atmospheric pollution.

The School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences’ Weaver Lecture Series was established in May of 1996 through an endowment provided by Earl H. and Sandra H. Weaver. The objective of the Weaver Lecture Series is to bring experts in various research areas relevant to forestry and wildlife sciences to the Auburn University campus to enhance the School’s academic programs through public lectures and interaction with faculty and students.

The lecture is open to the public and will be held Tuesday, April 11, at 3:30 p.m., in the Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Building, 1101 Conference Room. A reception for Dr. Fowler will be held prior to the lecture at 3:00 p.m.  For details about the Weaver Lecture Series and to review research abstracts, visit http://wp.auburn.edu/sfws/weaver/.

 

 

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