Chappelka, Art

Art Chappelka, Professor

SFWS 4329 | (334) 844-1047 | chappah@auburn.edu
BS, University of Florida, 1976, Forestry; MS, University of Florida, 1979, Forest Pathology; PhD, VPI & SU, 1986, Plant Pathology.
Specialization: Air Pollution Effects on Forest Trees and Ecosystems.
Teaching Responsibilities: Wildland recreation philosophy and policy. Air pollution effects on forests.
Research Interests: Research related to physiological and edaphic effects of several atmospheric contaminants.
Research Projects:
Effects of ozone on eastern forest trees.
Effects of climate change air pollutants on forest stand structure and functions
AuthorsYearTitlePublishing InfoLink
Chappelka, A.H. and N.E. Grulke. 2015Disruption of the ‘disease triangle’ by chemical and physical environmental change.Plant Biology (online: DOI 10.1111/plb.12353).
Chappelka, A.H., E.F. Loewenstein, G.L. Somers, G.J. Keever and N.A. Martin. 2015Determination of crew size efficiency relative to urban tree inventories.Arbor. & Urban For. 41:223-229.
Chieppa, J.*, A. Chappelka and L. Eckhardt. 2015Effects of tropospheric ozone on loblolly pine seedlings inoculated with root infecting ophiostomatoid fungi.Environ. Pollut. 2017: 130-137.
Gilliland, N.J.*, A.H. Chappelka, R.B. Muntifering and S.S. Ditchkoff. 2015Changes in southern Piedmont grassland community structure and nutritive quality with future climate scenarios of elevated tropospheric ozone and altered rainfall patterns.Plant Biology (online: DOI 10.1111/plb.12324).
Jones, T.W.*, L. Marzen and A. Chappelka. 2015Horizontal accuracy assessment of global positioning system data from common smartphones.Papers in Applied Geography 1:1: 59-64 (online: DOI 10.1080/23754931.2015.1009304).
Gilliland, N. J., A. H. Chappelka, R. B. Muntifering, and S. S. Ditchkoff. 2015Changes in southern Piedmont grassland community structure and nutritive quality with future climate scenarios of elevated tropospheric ozone and altered rainfall patterns.Plant Biology 18:47-55.
*Chieppa, J.J., Chappelka, A.H., and Eckhardt, L.G. 2015Effects of tropospheric ozone on loblolly pine seedlings inoculated with root infecting ophiostomatoid fungi.Environ. Poll. 207: 130-137.
Chappelka, A.H., Loewenstein, E.F., Somers, G.L., Keever, G.J., and Martin, N.A. 2015Determination of crew size efficiency relative to urban tree inventories.Arboriculture and Urban Forestry 41 (4):223-229.
Huyler, A., A.H. Chappelka, S.A. Prior and G.L. Somers. 2014Influence of aboveground tree biomass, home age, and yard maintenance on soil carbon levels in residential yards. Urban Ecosystems 17:787-805.
Zhang, C., H. Tian, S. Pan, G. Lockaby, and A. Chappelka. 2014Multi-factor controls on terrestrial carbon dynamics in urbanized areas.Biogeosciences 11: 7107-7124.
Martin, N.A., A.H. Chappelka, E.F. Loewenstein, G.J. Keever, and G. Somers.2013Evaluation of sampling protocol for iTree Eco: A care study in predicting ecosystem services at Auburn University, Alabama. Arbor. & Urban For. 39: 56-61.
Huyler, A., A.H. Chappelka, S.A. Prior, and G.L. Somers.2013Drivers of soil carbon in residential ‘pure lawns’ in Auburn, Alabama.Urban Ecosy. (Online: DOI 10.1007/s11252-013-0294-3).
Zhang, C., H. Tian, S. Pan, B. G. Lockaby, and A. H. Chappelka. 2013Multi-factor controls on terrestrial carbon dynamics in urbanized areas.Bio geosciences Disc. 10: 17597-17631.
Laband, D.N., W. C. Morse, A. H. Chappelka, and S.A. Enebak. 2013The Toomer’s OaksTragedy and the Importance of Cultural Environmental Services.Southern Journal of Applied Forestry.
Escobedo, F., A. Chappelka, C. Staudhammer, and H. Mayer. 2013Evaluating the use of i-Tree Eco in the Southeastern US.Florida Arborist 16(3)15-16.
Chen, G., H. Tian, C. Zhang, M. Liu, W. Ren, W. Zhu, A. H. Chappelka, S. A. Prior and G. B. Lockaby.2012Drought in the Southern United States over the 20th century: variability and its impacts on terrestrial ecosystem productivity and carbon storage.Climatic Change: (online): DOI 10.1007/s10584-012-0410-z.
Gilliland, N.J., A.H. Chappelka, R.B. Muntifering, F.L. Booker and S.S. Ditchkoff.2012Digestive utilization of ozone-exposed forage by rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).Environ. Pollut. 163: 281-286.
Martin, N.A., A.H. Chappelka, E.F. Loewenstein G.J. Keever and G. Somers.2012Predictive open-grown crown width equations for three oak species planted in a southern urban locale.Arbor.& Urban For. 38: 57-62.
Martin, N.A., A.H. Chappelka, E.F. Loewenstein and G.J. Keever.2012Comparison of carbon storage, carbon sequestration, and air pollution removal by protected and maintained urban forests in Alabama, USA. Internat. J. Biodivers. Sci., Eco. Serv. & Mang. 8: 265-272.
Neufeld, H.S., S. J. Peoples, A.W. Davison, A.H. Chappelka, G. L. Somers, J. E. Thomley, and F.L. Booker.2012Ambient ozone effects on gas exchange and total non-structural carbohydrate levels in cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata L.) growing in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Environ.Pollut. 160: 74-81.
Tian, H., G. Chen, C. Zhang, M. Liu, G. Sun, A. Chappelka, W. Ren, X. Xu, C. Lu, S. Pan, H. Chen, D. Hui, S. McNulty, G. Lockaby, and E. Vance.2012Century-Scale Responses of Ecosystem Carbon Storage and Flux to Multiple Environmental Changes in the Southern United States.Ecosystems 15: 674-694.
Zhang,C., H. Tian, G. Chen, A. Chappelka, X. Xu, W. Ren, D. Hui, M. Liu, C. Lu, S. Pan, G. Lockaby.2012Impacts of urbanization on carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems of the Southern United States.Environ. Pollut. 164: 89-101.
Laband, D.N., W.C. Morse, S.A. Enebak and A.H. Chappelka.2012The Toomer’s Oaks tragedy and the importance of cultural environmental services.South. J. Appl. For. 36(4):220-222.
Gilliland, N. J., A. H. Chappelka, R. B. Muntifering, F. L. Booker, and S. S. Ditchkoff. 2012Digestive utilization of ozone-exposed forage by rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).Environmental Pollution 163:281-286.
Martin, N.A.; Chappelka, A.H.; Keever, G.J.; Loewenstein, E.F. 2011A 100% tree inventory using i-tree eco protocol: a case study at Auburn University.Arboriculture and Urban Forestry 37(5):207-212.
Ren, W., H. Tian, B. Tao, A. Chappelka, G. Sun, C. Lu, M. Liu, G. Chen and X. Xu. 2011Impacts of tropospheric ozone and climate change on net primary productivity and net carbon exchange of China’s forest ecosystems.Global Ecol. Biogeogr. 20: 391-406
Styers, D.M., A.H. Chappelka, L.J. Marzen, and G.L. Somers. 2011Determination of Alterations in Forest Condition Using Various Measures of Land Use Change along an Urban-Rural Gradient in the West Georgia Piedmont, USA.” ISRN Ecology, vol. 2011, Article ID 461310, 12 pages, 2011. doi:10.5402/2011/461310.
Martin, N.A., Chappelka, A.H., Loewenstein, E.F., and Keever, G.J. 2011Optimum urban tree inventory crew size: results from an i-Tree Eco project at Auburn University.City Trees 47(6):16.
Styers, D.M., A.H. Chappelka, L.J. Marzen, and G.L. Somers. 2010Developing a land-cover classification to select indicators of forest ecosystem health in a rapidly urbanizing landscape.Landscape and urban planning 94: 158-165.
Styers, D.M., A.H. Chappelka, L.J. Marzen, and G.L. Somers. 2010Scale matters: indicators of ecological health along the urban-rural interface near Columbus, Georgia. Ecological indicators 10:224-233.
tianhan, H. G., M. Chen, C. Liu, C. Zhang, G. Sun, C. Lu, X. Xu, W. Ren, S. Pan, A. H Chappelka. 2010Model estimates of net primary productivity, evapotranspiration, and water.Forest ecology and management 259: 1311-1327.
tianhan, H. Q., G. Chen, M. Liu, C. Zhang, G. Sun, C. Lu, X. Xu, W. Ren, S. Pan, and A. H. Chappelka.2010Model estimates of net primary productivity, evapotranspiration, and water use efficiency in the terrestrial ecosystems of the southern United States during 1895–2007.Forest Ecol. Manage. 259:1311-1327.
Szantoi, Z., A.H. Chappelka, R.B. Muntifering, and G.L. Somers.2009Cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata L.) response to ozone and ethylenediurea (EDU).Environmental Pollution 157: 840-846.
Ditchkoff, S.S., J.S. Lewis, J.C. Lin, R.B. Muntifering, and A.H. Chappelka.2009Nutritive quality of highbush blackberry (Rubus argutus) exposed to tropospheric ozone.Rangeland Ecology and Mangement 62: 364-370.
Ditchkoff, S. S., J. S. Lewis, J. C. Lin, R. B. Muntifering, and A. H. Chappelka.2009Nutritive quality of highbush blackberry (Rubus argutus) exposed to tropospheric ozone.Rangeland Ecology and Management 62:364-370.
Booker F., R. Muntifering, M. McGrath, K. Burkey, D. Decoteau, E. Fiscus, W. Manning, S. Krupa, A. Chappelk, and D. Grantz.2009The ozone component of global change: potential effects on agricultural and horticultural plant yield, product quality and interactions with invasive species.Journal of Integrated Biology 51: 337-351.
Styers, D.M and A.H. Chappelka.2009Urbanization and atmospheric deposition: Using bioindicators of determining patterns of land-use change in West Georgia.Water, Air and Soil Pollution 200: 371-386.
Neufeld, H.S. and A.H. Chappelka.2007Commentary for papers resulting from the recent symposium on air pollution and vegetation effects in national parks and natural areas: Implications for science, policy and management. Environmental Pollution 149:253-255.
Zhang, C, H.Q. Tian, A. Chappelka, W. Ren, M. Liu, and G. Chen.2007Impacts of climatic and atmospheric changes on carbon dynamics in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.Environmental Pollution 149 (2007) 336-347.
Ren, W., H.Q. Tian, G. Chen, M. Liu, C. Zhang, A.H. Chappelka, and S. Pan.2007Influence of ozone pollution and climate variability on grassland ecosystem productivity across China.Environmental Pollution 149 (2007) 327-335.
Ren W., H. Tian, G. Chen, M. Liu, C. Zhang, A.H. Chappelka, and S. Pan.2007Influence of ozone pollution and climate variability on net primary productivity and carbon storage in China’s grassland ecosystems from 1961 to 2000.Environmental Pollution 149: 327-335.
Karnosky, D.F, J.M. Skelly, K.E. Percy, and A. H. Chappelka.2007Perspectives regarding 50 years of research on effects of tropospheric ozone air pollution on US forests.Environmental Pollution 147: 489-506.
Grulke, N.E., H.S. Neufeld, A.W. Davison, M. Roberts, and A.H. Chappelka2007Stomatal behavior of ozone-sensitive and –insensitive coneflowers (Rudbeckia laciniata var. digitata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.New Phytologist 173: 100-109.
Chappelka, A.H., G.L. Somers, and J.R. Renfro.2007Temporal patterns of foliar ozone symptoms on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata L.) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.Environmental Pollution 149: 358-365.
Szantoi, Z., A.H. Chappelka, R.B. Muntifering, and G.L. Somers.2007Use of ethylenediurea to ameliorate ozone effects on purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea).Environmental Pollution 150: 200-208.
Muntifering, R.B., A.H. Chappelka, J.C. Lin, D.F. Karnosky and G.L. Somers2006Chemical composition and digestibility of Trifolium exposed to elevated ozone and carbon dioxide in a free air (FACE) fumigation system.Function. Ecol.20: 269-275.
Taylor, T.S. E.F. loeweed and A.H. Chappelka.2006Effect of animal browse protection and fertilizer application on the establishment of planted Nuttall oak seedllings.New For. 32:133-143.
Taylor, T.S.; Loewenstein, E.F., and Chappelka, A.H.2006Effect of animal browse protection and fertilizer application on the establishment of planted oak seedlings.New Forests 32:133-143.
Lewis, J. S., S. S. Ditchkoff, J. C. Lin, R. S. Muntifering, and A. H. Chappelka2006Nutritive quality of big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) and eastern gammagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides) exposed to tropospheric ozone.Rangeland Ecology and Management 59:267-274
Souza, L., H.S. Neufeld, A.H. Chappelka, K.O. Burkey and A.W. Davison. 2006Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.Environ. Pollut.141:175-183.
Burkey, K.O., H.S. Neufeld, L. Souza, A.H. Chappelka and A.W. Davison2006Seasonal profiles of leaf ascorbic acid metabolism in ozone-sensitive wildflowersEnviron. Pollut.143: 427-434.
Neufeld, H.S., A.H. Chappelka, G.L. Somers, K.O. Burkey, A.W. Davison and P. Finkelstein. 2006Visible foliar injury caused by ozone alters the relationship between SPAD meter readings and chlorophyll concentrations in cutleaf coneflower.Photosynth. Res.87: 281-286.

Current Projects:

Southern Piedmont grassland community structure and functioning under future climate scenarios of elevated tropospheric ozone and altered rainfall amounts

The physical and chemical climate of the earth has changed rapidly over the last 100 years and is predicted to change dramatically in the future. Models predict that tropospheric ozone (O3) concentrations will increase on a global basis for the next 50 yrs while summer rainfall may either decrease or increase ~10–20% based on model predictions in the Southeastern United States. This region is experiencing rapid population growth and includes a number of areas in noncompliance with current NAAQS for O3. Increases in O3 in combination with altered rainfall amounts have been little studied in grassland ecosystems in the Southern Piedmont region which covers 17 million ha from central Virginia into eastern Alabama. The study area is approximately 5 km from Auburn University and contains open-top chambers (OTCs), equipment and monitoring sheds, office and laboratory facilities. To establish a typical managed grassland community, 12 OTCs were seeded (March 2007) with a mixture of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea, C3, cool-season grass), common bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon, C4 warm-season grass), dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum C4, warm-season grass) and ladino clover (Trifolium repens, C3 cool-season legume). Our global hypothesis is that exposure to elevated O3 alone or in combination with altered rainfall amounts modifies resource acquisition and biomass allocation of dominant, managed-grassland species in such a way that community structure and functioning of the system is impacted. Specific hypotheses include: 1) Species with higher stomatal conductance (gs) will be more adversely affected by elevated O3 than those with lower gs because uptake (and hence dose) will be greater, resulting in shifts in productivity and species composition and productivity over time; 2) The effects of O3 and altered rainfall amounts will be mediated by changes in gs and canopy-level responses such as changes in cover and structure;  and 3) Elevated O3 will increase production of plant secondary metabolites, notably lignin, and these shifts in energy allocation will be altered by either decreased or increased rainfall additions.  Various field measurements (species abundance, richness, gas exchange and water relations,) and laboratory methodologies (plant defensive compounds, chlorophyll analysis) will be used to test the specific hypotheses. Integration of various measures of diversity and productivity and underlying physiological and biochemical responses will enable a more complete characterization and modeling of potential impacts of future climate change scenarios on these plant communities. Funding is provided through USDA Hatch funds.

Quantifying urban forest structure, functioning and economic value in a small, expanding southern metropolis

An urban forest can be defined as the sum total of all vegetation growing in an urban metropolis. Some of these forested areas may have been intentionally planted along streets or around building structures. Also, many trees whether planted or natural are in landscapes such as parks, golf courses and yards.  Other forested areas have been left over from small tracts of land preserved during development or left unattended. When buildings and other structures are included in the urban forest matrix, a complex ecosystem exists. Initially, urban forests were mainly recognized and managed for aesthetics. It is now known, however that these ecosystems serve many essential functions including pollution removal, carbon storage, erosion control, energy  savings and other vital ecosystem services.  Quantifying these functions and determining the compensatory values of these forests is essential to their management (vertical structure, density, species composition, etc.) and provides city officials with needed information regarding the planning and budgetary ($ for maintenance, tree removal, planting, etc.) process and development of protection measures (such as tree ordinances, etc.). There has been some research in this area, however, the vast majority has occurred in large metropolitan city primarily in the North-Central and Northeastern US. We (Art Chappelka & Ed Loewenstein Investigators) have developed a project to quantify the structure function and economic value of the urban forest in a small, rapidly expanding urban metropolis (Auburn, Alabama) in the southern United States. The specific objectives are 1) Analysis of structural components, including species composition and distribution patterns in the urban forest; 2) Estimation of carbon storage and air pollution removal by the forest and comparison among forest types; and 3) Development of new algorithms for Urban Forest Effects (UFORE) model specifically for local southern vegetation. Funding is partially provided through the USDA McStennis program.

Urban Forest Inventory: UFORE Pilot Project at Auburn University

Urban Forestry involves the planning, establishment, protection, and management of trees and associated plants, individually, in small groups, or under forested conditions within different metropolitan areas (Cites, suburbs, towns, etc.). Programs within the discipline often include the following: Program planning, tree inventories, tree planting, tree maintenance, tree preservation and public education. These elements are not mutually exclusive. As part of the planning process, an inventory of tree resources is a fundamental initial phase for most programs. Street tree inventories have been commonplace, but given the use of advanced technologies one is now able to determine the benefits (C sequestration, cooling, reduction in pollutants, etc.) and liabilities (hazards, encroachment with power-lines, etc.) of the entire urban forest. In that vein, we are using a computer-based model (UFORE) to analyze field-collected data to provide information on the urban forest structure and function on the campus of Auburn University. The project is interdisciplinary in nature involving investigators from The School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences, Horticulture and the US Forest Service. The overall goal is to develop a 100% inventory of trees on the core campus of Auburn University using the UFORE protocol for the purpose of validating model components in the region, and investigating extended and optimal use of the program. An addition goal is to provide a database that can be utilized by University personnel in planting and maintaining adequate greenspace on campus. Specific objectives include: 1) Conduct a 100% inventory in UFORE compatible form and complete GIS database layer from the data (i.e. tree locations will be captured); 2) Analyze model components relative to southern species & models, and make UFORE plot sampling comparisons with the 100% inventory; and 3) Develop class & field training material and conduct a regionally advertised training class for UFORE including QA/QC components. A graduate student: Nick Martin (MS) is conducting research on different aspects of this project.

Teaching Responsibilities:
•Advanced Studies on Effects of Air Pollution (graduate level): 1992,1994,1996,1998, 2000, 2003,2005-2006
•Natural Resource Policy Analysis and Administration (graduate level-team taught): 2007
•Wildlife Resource Philosophy and Policy (undergraduate level): 2008
•Wildland Recreation Philosophy and Policy (undergraduate level): 1998-2001, 2003
•Urban Forestry (advanced undergraduate/graduate level): 1990-1997
•Introduction to Renewable Natural Resources (undergraduate level): 2003-2006

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