AWW Infographic welcomes all to Alabama

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Last summer, through the creative work of Information Technology Specialist, Jennie Powers (College of Business/College of Agriculture), Alabama Water Watch (AWW) developed an infographic poster depicting Alabama’s world-class aquatic biodiversity. Did you know that Alabama ranks number one among all 50 states in the number of freshwater fish species (332 species, over a quarter of all of the freshwater fish species found in the United States), and number one in the number of crayfish, mussels, freshwater snails and freshwater turtles! We have species that rival the tropical fishes in their rainbow of colors and beauty.

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AWW monitor watches Mobile’s water

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by Eric Reutebuch

Contributed article by:
By: Dr. Mimi Fearn – Co. Chair, 2017 Citizens Action Committee; Chair, DRCR Water Quality Monitoring Coordinator
Jason Kudulis – Monitoring and Science Coordinator, Mobile Bay National Estuary Program

Water watching is seeing a revival in the Mardi Gras City! Thanks to the efforts of Mobile Bay National Estuary Program and Dr. Mimi Fearn, former chair and faculty member in the Department of Earth Sciences  at University of South Alabama (retired), past president of the Dog River Clear Water Revival (DRCWR) and long-time water watcher and AWW water monitor trainer, the ranks of citizen monitors are growing as well as their watershed stewardship activities!

Eric Holladay testing water chemistry

Eric testing on Dog River just upstream from where Halls Mill and Rabbit Creek meet Alabama Water Watch site #06005027.

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AU grad student spreading the word – Watershed Stewardship!

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Rasika Ramesh is a doctoral student in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences at Auburn University. Her research focuses on modeling hydrology and water quality of headwater wetlands in Alabama’s Coastal Plain to understand how they function. In her spare time, she has a passion for conducting outreach related to watershed stewardship to young and old alike. Check out her recent effort at Mama Mocha’s in Auburn.

Rasika explaining the importance of viewing the landscape in terms of watersheds.

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Stephen Tsikalas, AWW trainer & monitor extraordinaire!

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Stephen Tsikalas attended his first AWW workshops in 2014. He got certified as both a water chemistry and bacteriological monitor, then, in 2015, advanced to become an AWW trainer. He has integrated AWW water monitoring into his Geography curriculum at Jacksonville State University, where he teaches. Water quality monitoring provides the students with real-world beyond-the-classroom field experience that melds seamlessly into their Geography studies. Over the past two years, Stephen and his students have monitored local streams and springs in the Jacksonville area, and Stephen has conducted or assisted in several AWW trainings, certifying more than 75 new citizen volunteer monitors!

Stephen monitoring water chemistry at local stream near Gadsden.

Stephen monitoring water chemistry at local stream near Jacksonville.

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