AWW Office COVID-19 Update

AWW Office Operations

If you need to come by our office, please call or email to make an appointment.

UPDATE – Training Opportunities

AWW is starting to offer in-person certification and recertification sessions in addition to the online and hybrid offerings that will be available soon. All in-person workshops will follow the health and safety guidelines set by Auburn University and the Alabama Cooperative Extension System.

As soon as those opportunities are available, information will be provided on the AWW website and through email communications. If you are interested in being trained as a monitor, please complete the Workshop Interest Survey below and we will contact you when opportunities are available.

https://auburn.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_af1oUBNMF0YIfJz

Current Monitors

Please note that monitors in need of recertification have been given an extension of their certifications until they are able to attend a recertification session. They will be permitted to enter data. Options for recertification will be available in the coming weeks.

Current monitors can continue to monitor water as long as they abide by all safety guidelines and requirements. Each monitor has a unique situation related to where they monitor, and with whom they monitor. Please use the following resources to make the best decision for your situation, and don’t hesitate to contact AWW if in doubt.

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AWW Tiger Giving Project, Protect Alabama Waterways, Mini-grant Program

WE ARE CURRENTLY RECEIVING APPLICATIONS FOR THE AWW TIGER GIVING PROJECT MINI-GRANT PROGRAM!! CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE APPLICATION.

If you are a certified AWW monitor and need some help to get started monitoring at an orphaned site or a new site, in the form of a water chemistry test kit, water chemistry reagents to refill an existing kit, or bacteria supplies, this mini-grant program is for you!

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2021 Alabama Fish Consumption Advisories

Catfish Image credit: Shutterstock

Refer to the 2020 Alabama Fish Advisory blog for the basics of fish consumption advisories, including what they are and what they mean.

To view the entire list of advisories, access the publication from the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) here: https://www.alabamapublichealth.gov/tox/assets/al-fish-advisory-2021.pdf

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All About the Escatawpa and Perdido River Basins

The Escatawpa River is a 129-mile long river in southwest Alabama and southeast Mississippi that originates in the town of Millry, AL.  It is a tributary of the Pascagoula River that ultimately drains into the Gulf of Mexico at Pascagoula Bay. The Escatawpa flows through two counties in Alabama: Washington and Mobile. Escatawpa means “where cane is cut” in the Choctaw language. Cane refers to the Southeast’s native bamboo, Arundinaria spp. also known as rivercane.

The Perdido River is a 65-mile long river in southwest Alabama and northwest Florida. The Perdido forms the western boundary between Alabama and Florida for almost its entire length, ultimately draining into the Perdido Bay of the Gulf of Mexico. Its headwaters begin in Escambia County, AL northwest of the town of Atmore, flows into Baldwin County, AL, and shares the state line with Escambia County, FL. Perdido means “lost” in Spanish and was named by Spanish settlers who occupied the area until 1813.

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Twelve Months of Alabama Rivers!

Alabama Water Watch works to protect Alabama’s precious water resources by training citizens to collect credible water quality data from rivers, lakes, and other local waterbodies.  Educating people about Alabama’s waters and helping them to find a meaningful connection to their watershed is an important part of what we do.

Lucky for us, Alabama has so much to offer in the way of water resources, it is easy to foster these connections.  With 132,000 miles of streams and rivers, Alabama can call itself “the River State”. Moreover, each river has a unique set of flora and fauna, geology, culture and history that can provide you with a lifetime’s worth of learning.

How much do you know about your own river basin? Check out AWW’s Twelve Months of Alabama Rivers  campaign to test your knowledge and learn more. During each month of 2021, we will be publishing blog articles and social media posts that highlight the unique and interesting characteristics of each of the state’s major river basins.

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