Meet the fine folks that keep AWW growing statewide!

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by Rita Grub

I bet you’re enjoying the warmer temps and signs of spring – soft greens and colors we haven’t seen for several months.  And maybe you’re like me – amazed that over 25% of 2014 is in the past.  It’s been a BUSY time for AWW:

  • There have been over 30 workshops and recertification sessions this year  -  awesome!!!
  • There have been 75 new Water Chemistry and 76 new Bacteriological monitors trained in these workshops
  • And almost 30 monitors have been recertifed!

Continue reading

Lake Watch and Lake Martin – in good hands!

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Read about the revived water quality monitoring efforts of a dedicated troop of citizen volunteer monitors empowered by AWW to monitor the waters of Alabama’s Treasured Lake, led by Lake Watch Technical Coordinator and AWW-certified trainer, Ann Campbell.

Ann and Matt Campbell hosting an AWW Bacteriological Monitoring Workshop at their home on Lake Martin (Matt demonstrates how NOT to transfer the media into a petri dish :)  ).

Ann and Matt Campbell hosting an AWW Bacteriological Monitoring Workshop at their home on Lake Martin (Matt demonstrates how NOT to transfer the media into a petri dish :)

Click here for the article: Watching the water
(source: LAKE MAGAZINE -  http://www.lakemartinmagazine.com/ )

 

What’s all the buzz about?

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Auburn water researchers using bees to help Kenya with nutrition, income and river protection (source: Auburn Daily, 3/4/2014)
In Kenya, traditional cultures place a high value on honey and related products of the beehive. In the past it was part of the dowry or “bride price” for marriage, and a man needed to have at least 20 liters of choice honey to present to a prospective father-in-law when asking for his daughter’s hand. More than just a tradition, this commodity could be the key to improving many aspects of Kenyan lives. Auburn University’s Global Water Watch has joined with Kenya’s Green Belt Movement to find innovative ways of linking honey production with improved nutrition, higher incomes, community development and river protection.

Auburn's Global Water Watch has joined with Kenya's Green Belt Movement to find innovative ways of linking honey production with improved nutrition, higher incomes, community development and river protection.

Auburn’s Global Water Watch has joined with Kenya’s Green Belt Movement to find innovative ways of linking honey production with improved nutrition, higher incomes, community development and river protection.

CLICK HERE for the complete story.

Alabama Water Watch – Alive and Well

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Those of you who are familiar with the Alabama Water Watch (AWW) Program probably know that we went through a rough patch the past few years (as did many other volunteer-based organizations, NGOs, as well as state and federal agencies). Funding from grants has been much more limited and the competition for fewer grant dollars has greatly increased. Thanks to support from the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, and integration into the AU Water Resources Center, AWW’s future is a bright one! The move to AWW’s new home and merger with the AU Water Resources Center in the new Hubbard CASIC Building at 559 Devall Drive at Auburn University was completed in September of 2013.

Thanks to the concerted efforts of the AWW staff, our dedicated volunteer trainers, and dozens of veteran monitors and newly-certified monitors, 2013 was a very productive year. Accomplishments included:

  • 25 water chemistry workshops,
  • 17 bacteriological workshops,
  • 2 stream Biomonitoring workshops ,
  • 29 volunteer monitor recertification sessions,
  • 391 newly-certified AWW volunteer monitors, and,
  • submission of over 3,500 water quality data records to the online AWW database. Continue reading

The Hidden Benefits of Alabama Water Watch

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by Bill Deutsch

We water monitors often think of AWW success in terms of sites monitored, water data collected and positive actions taken with that information.  The “crème de la crème” might be an improvement in water quality or policy, and we’ve seen some good examples of that over the years (see our Success Story blogs on this website).  But what about more subtle, even hidden, benefits of our program and work? Continue reading

Neither Rain, nor Snow, nor Dark of Night…

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by Bill Deutsch

January 29, 2014…OK, so I procrastinated in my monthly monitoring of Hodnett and Saugahatchee Creeks in Lee County (Tallapoosa River Watershed).  Because the last day of the month was not an option, I was left with three choices: a) sample today with snow on the ground, b) wait until tomorrow after temperatures are forecasted to plunge to 13 F overnight, or c) the “unthinkable” …skip sampling in January. Trudging through the snow for the first time in 15 years of monthly sampling of Hodnett Creek was fun, and my old Border Collie, Jazz, accompanied me to make sure I didn’t get lost (I made sure she drank out of the creek downstream of where I monitored!). Air temperatures hovered around 1 C, but the water was a toasty 4 C at both sites (record low for my data). Continue reading